Help us learn more about our responses to COVID19

It is a strange and, for many, a really difficult time. I hope you are all managing as well as possible and that your and yours are all doing ok…

I know its been a while since the last post (hopefully that will change soon) but I think that a project I am currently taking part in may be of interest to many of you, and I wanted to share an opportunity to take part…

What is the ‘psychology’ of epidemic diseases?

This is the question we are exploring! I’m part of a team at London South Bank University who are exploring how we respond psychologically to events such as the COVID19 outbreak – we have some studies we have completed the initial phases of work for already (such as looking at how being in a group changes the way we feel about disease), but also some that are currently recruiting. If you’d like to help us, you may be able to volunteer to take part in one in particular…

What does it involve?

In brief, we are looking for people to spend about 30-40 minutes with us to do an interview via phone or Skype, discussing how they seek out, understand and evaluate information around corona virus.

Who can take part?

We are looking for volunteers who are English speakers living in the UK who are aged between 20-30 years old and also UK ex-pats who live in Hong Kong of any age.

How can I find out more?

Easy! just email me at fringsd@lsbu.ac.uk and we will be in touch with an information sheet which has full details 🙂 Equally, please share this invite with anyone you know who may be interested and eligible to take part 🙂

In anycase…

Regardless of whether this is of interest or not, I really hope you are all able to stay as healthy (physically and, of course, psychologically) as possible over the coming weeks, not matter what is thrown at you. I also hope that when silver linings do appear (whether this is being less busy and taking time to yourself, being more busy learning new skills, or just appreciating the sunshine through kitchen window) you are able to grab the opportunity…

Do you know people in AA?

As part of our ongoing research programme into social identity and the role it plays in recovery,  Prof Ian Albery and I are currently running an online study exploring how people who are members of AA perceive and are affected by hearing other people’s life stories. The survey takes around 15 minutes to complete. There is no participant payment, but we hope the study will help improve our understanding of recovery and thus help people in the long-term.

We’re looking for around 150 people to take part, so if you know anyone who may be interested – or groups who could promote the study –  please do let them know. People can find out more, and take part, via this link;

https://lsbupsychology.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8qpuoQmOmcTbn9P

Participants must be English speakers who are AA members, and participation is completely anonymous.

Thanks in advance to anyone who helps 😊

Who writes fake news and why?

BREAKING: Clinton Foundation Ship Seized at Port of Baltimore Carrying Drugs, Guns and Sex Slaves

Seriously?

Fake news is a combination of the psychology of persuasion (how to design a message people will buy by carefully thinking about the audience, message source and content). It is also a striking example of the power of social identity – people often much prefer and share stories which bash the ‘other’ and loudly protest when their own are smeared.

But where does fake news come from? And why do people write it? I read a super article on bbc news today (which, despite occasional protests, probably isn’t fake!) which explores this in depth – I urge you to do the same. Written by Anisa Subedar, it’s informative and, in my opinion, beautifully written…

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/resources/idt-sh/the_godfather_of_fake_news

Enjoy and have a super day!

Expectancy value approaches to motivation

The expectancy value theory of motivation is perhaps one of the simplest, but most useful, formulations of the psychology of motivation. Why do do we do things? According to expectancy approaches, because we think that they will probably generate an outcome we value. But is there more to it than that? What is it that makes some goals seem attainable? And is it better to ‘shoot the moon’ for a high value outcome which is likely to be unattainable, or are we better going for something smaller,but more likely..?

Lets explore expectancy value theory in more depth….

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You should not hit your kids.

An end to physical punishment of children.

Should anyone, ever, hit their children? The weight of evidence from the psychological literature has leaned increasingly in the direction of ‘no’, but recent research presents the strongest case yet. A recent review1 pulls the vast body of work in this area together and makes strong case against physical punishment – likening it’s effects to straight-up physical abuse. The scale of this issue is staggering: in 2012, amongst 11,000 US families surveyed, 30% of mothers of pre-schoolers admitted hitting their children in the last week, and 80% said they believed in it as a parenting tool 2 . Large numbers of health care professionals also think physical punishment can be, in moderation, a useful (or at least harmless) parenting tool.
But how do these beliefs stand up in front of the evidence? And what other parenting options are there?
Continue reading “You should not hit your kids.”

Free Social Prescribing event in London

The future of social prescribing workshop.

Some time ago, I wrote a post on social prescribing. Since then, I have ended up doing some research in this field. I am also helping to host a British Psychological Society sponsored workshop exploring ‘Challenges to Social Prescribing’. The London event will be taking place in November. If your are involved in the field, or just plain interested, I would love it if you could join us…. I am even giving a talk 🙂  Find out more below…

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Intrinsic motivation and extrinsic rewards

Intrinsic vs extrinsic motivation

Understanding how intrinsic and extrinsic forms of motivation differ helps us plan our activities and stay engaged with tasks at hand. Intrinsic motivation is based on inner values, whilst extrinsic is based on contingent rewards. But how can we harness our internal motivation and how (and when) do extrinsic rewards help (or hinder)? Read on to find more…

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Cognitive dissonance as a motivating tool.

What is cognitive dissonance?

Cognitive dissonance is a powerful tool which can be used to motivate us in various ways. As a concept, it is best explained through an example. Think about the following statement- ‘it is important that people give blood so that blood banks can be adequately supplied’. This is probably something that you agree with. Now ask yourself- do I regularly give blood? If you are reading this and do, you should feel pretty good about yourself . However, if you’re reading this you do not then you’re probably feeling a slight sense of unease. This response is the essence of cognitive dissonance – a feeling that one aspect of ourselves does not fit with another. But how does it work, and how can we harness it?

Continue reading “Cognitive dissonance as a motivating tool.”

Autonomy, mastery and purpose: 3 drivers of motivation.

What make us (and the people we work with) really engage in a task? The promise of ‘Fortune and Glory’? Or maybe ‘Fear and Loathing’? These are all common tools people use to manage their own and others’ motivation and engagement. But, maybe this is all wrong… maybe there is a smarter way… In this post, we look at an alternative perspective,focusing on autonomy, mastery and purpose. Read on to find out more….
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Social Psychology: The Basics is now written!

Social Psychology: The Basics is on it’s way!

As regular readers will know, this last year I have been writing a lot – this blog (which I admit has been a little hit and miss) but also papers (some of which I have posted about!) and another short e-book (Understanding and Managing Stress). However, one of the projects I am most proud of is the completion of my first ever textbook – Social Psychology: The Basics. I’m really excited to say that it has now been sent to the publishers! This mid-length book outlining the history of social psychology and the methods it uses and covers the theory and evidence that makes up the field. Along the way it explores the conflicts and controversies (including the recent replication crisis) which have, and continue to, shape it’s future. It also explores the application of the science of social psychology in the real world. If your a student or just interested in the field, you should definitely check it out!

I’m really excited that is has entered pre-production, and I am looking forward to telling you more about it as things develop :-).

Social Psychology: The Basics will be out later in the year, published by Routledge. Sign up for updates to get the latest news!

Like this? Check out the BookStore for more things I have written 🙂

A little bit more about the Basic’s series

The Basics series is published by Routledge, and aims to provide accessible, authoritative introductions to many many fields of study. Other titles in the ‘Basics’ series include Internet Psychology, Semiotics, Research Methods and about a zillion other topics – check out the full range here. I’m looking forward to joining such a great series!